Voting Trust Agreements and Effecting Corporate Action

If you want to cause a corporation do something on the corporate level if a particular event occurs, there are a variety of avenues you can pursue. Here are some options:

* Put a provision in the corporation’s charter (AKA Article of Organization or Articles of Incorporation). However, this is inflexible and costs money. If you want to change the provision, it’s a hassle. Plus, it’s a public document, so all the world knows what you’re doing.

* Create a Shareholders’ Agreement. The agreement among shareholders would recite all the reasons for the behavior, but there’s no guarantee that the behavior will occur, so it’s much riskier. A shareholder agreement gives the right to demand action, but can’t force the action. Only a lawsuit can do that.

* Change the corporation’s Bylaws to require the change. This doesn’t cost anything and it’s not public. That said, it ties the hands of the directors. If the event is conditional, then you also would have a side agreement among the shareholders to require the event to occur if the condition occurred. However, there’s an argument that this restricts the directors’ ability to manage the corporation unless all the directors are parties to the side agreement.

* Create a Voting Trust Agreement. A voting trust transfers the legal title to the stock and its voting rights to a trustee for a certain period of time. It affects only those shareholders who are party to the agreement. It provides flexibility and privacy and is fairly inexpensive.

Like any legal document, a voting trust agreement is a creature of the particular jurisdiction to which it is subject. The voting trust must be acknowledged by the corporation and its shareholders. Further, it’s a good idea for the trustee and alternate trustee to acknowledge it also.

A Conditional Voting Trust Agreement is a voting trust agreement that has no affect unless a particular event occurs. In that case, the trustee will step in with control of all shares to guarantee the results. Essentially, the trustee is an enforcer. It’s a good idea to avoid requiring the trustee to have physical possession of the shares in any voting trust agreement, as that could delay the trustee’s actions.

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