Communication in Your Company

Communication is critical to all of life’s relationships. Anytime two or more people are involved in a common endeavor or activity, a potential for miscommunication exists. And if the potential is there, it may well happen—that’s Murphy’s Law.

While it’s not typically a major focus when starting a company like sales, finance or the other functional areas, it is critical to success. As the organization grows, careful and clear communication among the company’s employees will make or break the company, especially if it is going through hard times or is operating during a time of market turmoil.

During my career, I’ve advised hundreds of clients ranging from tiny operations to global giants. What’s separated the great from the mediocre companies, regardless of size, has been the employees’ ability to communicate effectively.

For example, many companies develop a mission and key goals. Sometimes, they’re posted on a website, in an employee handbook or in the front lobby. Sometimes, they can be found only in the head of the company’s founder. Typically, company missions and critical drivers are not communicated or not communicated well to employees. As a result, employees can end up working towards different ends and at odds with each other.

Here are some practical tips for better company communication:

  • Focus on what is important to your company—mission and goals—regularly in company meetings. You have to repeat this information over and over and over; it can take a long time to sink in. You want everyone on the same train going down the same tracks.
  • You’ll gain trust by sharing knowledge than by hoarding information.
  • If you have bad news, it’s better to let your employees know than have rumor and uncertainty eat away at your company’s morale. Keeping Morale Up When Your Business is Down goes into more detail on this.
  • Communication in person is best.
  • Communication by video is second best.
  • Communication by telephone is third best.
  • Communication by written word is the least best way to relate to someone. Words, without visual or oral clues, are easily misinterpreted. Who among us has not ended up in a series of email or text exchanges that became angrier, misinterpreted or confused because of miscommunication?

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